Blog

Announcing The Last Walks

Announcing The Last Walks

Dears,

It's here--our seventh year and final festival! We've gathered an extraordinary group of artists, a dream roster, to lead The Last Walks

Following the festival, we'll be working to put together a book that details many prompts from artists' walks and what we think are best practices for creating one's own participatory walk. 

The New York Times broke the news this morning but below you can find all the deets. Last year our walks filled up the day we announced, so when you see something you like, get yer spot on. 

Walk debuts by:

Anna Azrieli
Becca Blackwell
Tania Bruguera and Mujeres en Movimiento 
Lee Sunday Evans
Okwui Okpokwasili
Aki Sasamoto

"The Last Walk" by Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith features cameos by: luciana achugar, Chiara Bernasconi, Michelle Boulé, Neil Freeman, Neil Goldberg, Wayne Koestenbaum, Erin Markey, and Pamela Z

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Hyperallergic is the media partner of The Last Walks.

::WALKS::

“Their Shoes” by Aki Sasamoto
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/their-shoes

“Concrete Jungle Gym” by Anna Azrieli
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/concrete-jungle-gym
 
“Tracing our Power” by Lee Sunday Evans
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/tracing-our-power
  
“This is my Worst Nightmare” by Becca Blackwell
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/my-worst-nightmare

“La Mano Inmigrante (The Immigrant Hand)” by Tania Bruguera and Mujeres en Movimiento
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/la-mano-inmigrante-immigrant-hand
 
“Market Thrum” by Okwui Okpokwasili
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/market-thrum
 
“The Last Walk” by Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith
Contributing artists: luciana achugar, Chiara Bernasconi, Michelle Boulé, Neil Freeman, Neil Goldberg, Wayne Koestenbaum, Erin Markey, and Pamela Z
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/last-walk
 
Festival identity and print: Agi Morawska
Web image from Agi’s design: Kira Shalom

See you soon!

Love,
Todd





Elastic City's Final Festival

Dears,

2016 will be monumental for us. Next summer, Elastic City will present our final festival and after that, there'll be a book for fans and future enthusiasts. The decision to wrap up Elastic City after next year’s festival wasn't an easy one to make, but we feel it's the right one. 2016 will be our 7th year. The itch.

In thinking about the future, the options we saw were: that Elastic City continue with a new Executive and Artistic Director or that EC institutionalize within a museum or larger organization. Well, we're a small but strong org (grrr) but we don't have the financial infrastructure to pay an ED and Artistic Director a livable wage. If we joined a larger organization, it’d provide more financial security but would compromise the urgency, form and presentation of the work. One reason we started making walks outside was so we didn’t have to answer to anyone other than you, the public.

But above all, we feel like Elastic City has met its mission and has explored this form well. We’ve developed a method. This is a project in poetry, really, and we're gonna go out with a celebration. I ain’t saying how just yet.

Our Associate Artistic Director Niegel Smith will take the baton, gild it a bit and present walks and other participatory work as part of his job as Artistic Director at the Flea Theater. Willing Participant will soldier on! I’ll continue to lead walks, give workshops on the form, etc, but I’ll also start new projects.

As I see it, EC has been incredibly rewarding—for me and for the artists and audiences involved. Since 2010, we have produced and presented over 125 original works. We’ve expanded the way in which thousands of people experience their everyday. But now’s not the moment to tout what we’ve done.

We’re raising $15,000 to help pay the artists well and offset production costs for 2016. Please click here to donate to our final year-end campaign. All donors will receive early registration sign-up. This past summer’s walks filled up on the day we announced!

With a donation of $30, we’ll mail a photograph of your choice. I shot them while traveling. The first 200 donors who give over $50 will receive a limited edition print by Agi Morawska that commemorates our 2016 festival.

I hope you'll join us in supporting our seventh year.

Love,
Todd and The Elastic City board (John DeCicco, Nora Hennessy, Heather Janoff Johnson, Peter Shankman, Niegel Smith, Ben Weber)

Tags:

Elastic City 2015 Benefit on Thursday, July 30, 2015

Elastic City 2015 Benefit

Come celebrate festival artists and fellow participants during our annual party to benefit Elastic City! This time, we’re taking over The Wild Project in the East Village!

Thursday, July 30th
7:30pm–10:30pm
The Wild Project (195 East 3rd Street; Manhattan)
$40 admission

You can purchase tickets through this link: http://elasticcity2015benefit.brownpapertickets.com/

Performers: Karen Finley, Ramzi Awn
Music Playlist: Vin Scelsa
Portraits: Santos Muñoz
M.C.: Ben Weber
Featuring: an undressing room, perfect moments and visual poems

Hors d'oeuvre: Butterfield Catering
Champagne cocktails: Tim Miner (Magic Touch Cocktails)
Dessert: Erica's Rugelach & Baking Company

Beer: Lagunitas Brewing Company
Champagne: Roederer Estate
Wine: Urban Wines
Sparkling Water: Perrier

Raffle to include prizes from: Beggars Group, The Bluestone Bed & Basecamp, eNe Salon, HERE Arts Center, Iron & Silk Personal Fitness, Joe's Pub, Kings County Distillery, Landmark Sunshine Cinema, Magic Touch Cocktails, The New Victory Theater, Shakespeare in the Park, Peter Shankman, St. Marks Bookshop, and more!

Raffle tickets $3/ticket or $20 for 10 tickets. You can purchase the raffle tickets with your benefit ticket.

Host Committee: John DeCicco, Nicolette Dixon, Nora Hennessy, Heather Janoff Johnson, Carla Kasumi, Sonya Kolowrat, Nancy Nowacek, Ben Pryor, Barbara Rogers, Todd Shalom, Peter Shankman, Niegel Smith, Ryan Tracy and Ben Weber

Festival partners: deCordova Sculpture Park & Museum, The Flea Theater, Gibney Dance, The Invisible Dog Art Center, JACK, Jack Geary Contemporary, The Library at the Public, The Poetry Project, Pratt Institute MFA in Writing, Sunview Luncheonette, and The Wild Project

Foundation support: The Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc.
Publicity: Blake Zidell & Associates
Festival Media Partner: Hyperallergic


2015 Festival Announcement

2015 Festival Announcement

Dears,

It's here! The New York Times broke the news this morning! We're thrilled to announce the details of our six-week free festival of artist-led participatory walks, talks and ways throughout New York City. July 7th thru August 18th. This note's got everything you need to know. Get your registration on now cuz capacity is limited and it's gonna fill up quick!

Walks by:
Kate Colby & Todd Shalom
Karen Finley & Violet Overn
Wayne Koestenbaum
Mimi Lien
Erin Markey
Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith

Talks by:
Julian & Leon Fleisher
Caleb Hammons
Freddie, Kate & Vin Scelsa
Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith

Ways by:
K.J. Holmes
Vadis Turner
Ben Weber
Stephen Winter

Benefit at The Wild Project in the East Village on Thursday, July 30th with performers including Ramzi Awn and Karen Finley

Presenting Partners: deCordova Sculpture Park & Museum, The Flea Theater, Gibney Dance, The Invisible Dog Art Center, JACK, Jack Geary Contemporary, The Library at the Public, The Poetry Project, Pratt Institute MFA in Writing, Sunview Luncheonette, UnionDocs and The Wild Project

Foundation support: The Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Our media partner is Hyperallergic and our publicist is Blake Zidell & Associates

Festival identity by Asad Pervaiz

::WALKS::

“Making Marks” by Wayne Koestenbaum
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/making-marks

"Duly Noted" by Kate Colby & Todd Shalom
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/duly-noted

“Sea Glass Mermaid” by Karen Finley & Violet Overn
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/sea-glass-mermaid

“DADDY WARBUCKS, PLEASE ADOPT ME (A.K.A. THE ANNIE TOUR!)” by Erin Markey
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/daddy-warbucks-please-adopt-me-aka-ann...

“Memory Palace” by Mimi Lien
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/memory-palace

“Ideally” by Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/ideally

::TALKS::

This year’s Elastic City talks have set out to undo the hierarchy of conventional artist talks in order to better situate the audience inside of an artist's work. The talks have been developed with each artist through Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith’s Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Process Space residency. Singer-producer Julian Fleisher and his father, the legendary pianist Leon Fleisher; performance curator and producer Caleb Hammons; free-form radio DJ Vin Scelsa, his novelist daughter Kate Scelsa, and supportive mother-wife Freddie Scelsa; and Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith will lead talks, each lasting approximately 60-90 minutes.

“Other Pursuits” by Caleb Hammons
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/other-pursuits

“The Scelsas” by Freddie, Kate and Vin Scelsa
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/scelsas

“Between Us” by Todd Shalom & Niegel Smith
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/between-us

“The Man I Love” by Julian & Leon Fleisher
http://www.elastic-city.org/walks/man-i-love

::WAYS::

“Visible Acoustics” by K.J. Holmes
http://www.elastic-city.org/ways/visible-acoustics

“PROPAGANZA!” by Ben Weber
http://www.elastic-city.org/ways/propaganza

“Make It Fly” by Stephen Winter
http://www.elastic-city.org/ways/make-it-fly

“Re-weavings” by Vadis Turner
http://www.elastic-city.org/ways/re-weavings

::BENEFIT::

Elastic City will host a benefit, Thursday, July 30, 7:30pm to 10:30pm, at The Wild Project (195 East 3rd Street) in the East Village. There will be performances by vocalist Ramzi Awn and performance artist Karen Finley, playlist by Vin Scelsa, portraits by Santos Muñoz and champagne cocktails by bartender Tim Miner (Magic Touch Cocktails).

Tickets are now on sale at $40/person at: http://elasticcity2015benefit.brownpapertickets.com/

See you soon!

Love,
Todd


Walk (On Ecstasy) With Me

photo: Dudu Quintanilha

photo: Dudu Quintanilha

This following text was presented by Ryan Tracy as part of the "Politics of the Walk" talk on September 28, 2014 at Pratt Institute; co-presented with Pratt's MFA in Writing.

"Walk (On Ecstasy) With Me: Elastic City Walks and The Politics of Participation" by Ryan Tracy

Elastic City intends to make its audience active participants in an ongoing poetic exchange with the places we live in and visit. Elastic City

It should be clear to us by now that walking, in its many forms, is undoubtedly caught up within many political vectors of power as well as the struggles that emerge in and against forces of political and social oppression. I would like to use my time here to give attention to “participation” as one facet of “the walk” that seems to vex easy attempts at attributing a positive ethical, political and aesthetic value to the walk in its collective form. I take Elastic City’s intention to “make” its audiences “active” in their participation seriously. And for some time now, I have obsessed over Todd’s notion of “poetic exchange.” I have a sense that the terms together—active participation and poetic exchange—do some alchemical work on each other. In what follows, I hope to get a little way into figuring out what that work is and what it might say about the work Todd, and Elastic City, are doing.

I would like to come at the politics of the participatory walk from a queer trajectory; specifically in relation to the terms of participation. What enabled us to come here? What are the terms of address that occasion our collective formation? Were we called here? And if so, who called us? How did they call us? Might we have come here by another call? And if so, how might a different call bring to our being here together new meanings? In short, how did we become this we? In what follows, I will use queer insights about the politics of participation alongside José Esteban Muñoz’s notion of queer collectivity in order to explore how we might think of the walk, as imagined by Elastic City, as a political performance of queer participation.

One of the things I have come to love about queer theory is that it demonstrates a rather earnest categorical ambivalence toward the politics of participation. “Participation” becomes a site for struggle in queer theory primarily because identifying and critiquing compulsory social norms (e.g. “compulsory heterosexuality”) has been central to explaining the ways that queers are produced, marginalized and punished in a given cultural context, but so has devising political strategies that must on some level take the shape of social, collective movements. I have no intention of resolving this ambivalence. In fact, its ambivalence is no doubt one of the things that makes queer theory such a vital tool for social critique.

This tension was put under the microscope in 2005 at an MLA panel discussion titled “The Antisocial Thesis in Queer Theory,” where Lee Edelman, Jack Halberstam, Tim Dean and José Muñoz faced off on the subject. At stake was whether or not queer theory would be thought of as a theory about individual refusals to participate in normative cultural projects, or, in contrast, if queer theory was a theory that sought out ways for queers to form collective social movements that would counter dominant cultural forces.

One of the more poignant arguments for the latter was offered by Muñoz, an argument he would go on to elaborate in 2011’s Cruising Utopia, is that a politics of individual refusals will ultimately benefit only those queers who already have the best chance of participating in individualist, capitalist, racist, sexist culture: “gay white men.” To be clear, the intervention Muñoz was offering cannot be reduced to the flippant argument that gay white men do not face serious struggles, nor that homophobia itself wasn’t a pernicious and persistent social phenomena, but, rather, that much of the queer theoretical work up until that point had the tendency to promote an anti­-relational (i.e. anti-­social), individualist politics of the negative. Muñoz’s impassioned critique of anti­-relational queer politics is that they were grounded upon a denial of the ways that race and class imbricate with the politics of sexuality. Thus, the resources that might support a rugged gay individualist survival (i.e. money, maleness and whiteness) are not available to those queers who are likely to have the least advantages or protections in our society. In other words, anti-­relational politics held almost no future promise for queers of color, queer women and trans people.

Muñoz offered collectivity as a necessary, urgent alternative to an anti-relational queer politics because it turns central queer principles (anti­-normalization, anti-­homophobia, anti­sexism, anti-­capitalism) into loci of affinity from which queer social movements can be launched and broadened. Thus, participation, in Muñoz’s imagination, is not merely an option (or opposition) between group participation in compulsory social norms or individually rejecting those norms. Muñoz’s formulation of queer refusal as a collective rejection of oppressive social norms restructures the terms of participation into a queer, social form. But what keeps this queer collectivity queer? While drawing socially affective affinities between marginalized groups and individuals was at the heart of Muñoz’s project, so was an insistence on the crucial role of individual, critical self-­reflection in the shaping and embodying of queer refusals (thinking here the chapter “Just Like Heaven” in Cruising Utopia). One key element that hovers around Muñoz’s queer collectivity is the gesture of invitation, a gesture that, in my reading, is crucial to keeping collective social projects queer.

I’d like to suggest that the form of collective participation that Muñoz is suggesting, one that is neither violently compulsory nor hubristically antisocial—one that is queer—must include the gesture of invitation. In the closing chapter of Cruising Utopia, Muñoz shares with us the song “Take Ecstasy with Me” by The Magnetic Fields. The song, like its title announces, is an invitation. “The Magnetic Fields are asking us to perform a certain stepping out with them,” Muñoz writes. This stepping out, according to Muñoz, is specifically a stepping out of “straight time,” of “the here and now,” of what he termed the pragmatic politics of the present, in favor of a potential future that awaits those who are willing to accept the invitation. “That stepping out,” Muñoz continues, “hopefully would include a night out on the town, but it could and maybe should be something more.” What I want to argue here, is that the gesture of the invitation, for Muñoz, is crucial to initiating collective projects that will be utopian and not risk falling into the blunt, instrumentalizing moves of pragmatic political thinking. If our social movements, our stepping out together, are to retain their queer utopian promise, then they must be attended by a queer invitation, a hopeful, playful gesture that signals our suspicion that there is more to this street we are walking along than the straight ­time trajectory from-­home-­to-­work-­and­-back­-again, and that intimates our willingness to step out of ourselves and into elsewheres that must be there. “Take ecstasy with me,” Muñoz says, “thus becomes a request to stand out of time together, to resist the stultifying temporality and time that is not ours, that is saturated with violence both visceral and emotional, a time that is not queerness...Taking ecstasy with one another is an invitation, a call to a then and there, a not­-yet-­here.”

I would like to conclude by arguing that Elastic City’s desire for participation, and its calls for an “ongoing poetic exchange,” is just such a queer invitation; a hopeful, winking, open gesture to step onto the street together, and in doing so, to step out of the “stultifying” presumptions of the dominant political, economic, and social logics that strive to overdetermine our experience of walking in public. The collective walk imagined by Elastic City neither rejects all forms of participation (although it will reject some), nor does it naively exclude individual subjective experience or reflection (in fact, it depends on them). Rather, the poetic exchange that Elastic City offers, or invites, is one in which the putting into motion of bodies in public spaces is rethought, reimagined, re-performed and rehearsed, so that whatever we thought the street was, is or could be, is radically eschewed—vacated—clearing a ground to move differently in the world, and, in doing so, to re-­make the world according to a queerer set of coordinates; that is, to actualize a world that insists on always becoming other than what we are told it should be.

Cruising Utopia can ultimately be read as an invitation,” Muñoz concluded about his own work. One might read Elastic City’s walks similarly. I certainly do. Yet it will be important to remember that, as speech acts, all invitations are at risk of failing. It is, no doubt, anxiety about such failure that fuels individual as well as institutional desires to set up and enforce regimes of compulsory participation. Resisting this impulse to compulsorize participation is not an easy task. But, if we are to insist on making and inhabiting worlds that overcome the paranoid logics of coercion, and if bringing about these worlds means devising and launching collective acts of political resistance that will require the participation of many, of ourselves and others, then it is a risk we must seductively, repeatedly, invite.

Further Reading:

Caserio, Robert L.. 2006. With Lee Edelman, Judith Halberstam, José Esteban Muñoz and Tim Dean. “The Antisocial Thesis in Queer Theory.” PMLA. Vol. 121, No. 3. pp.819­828.

José Esteban Muñoz. 2009. Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity. New York and London: New York University Press.